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Caribbean Nationals Did Not Just Arrive In America

CaribWorldNews, NEW YORK, NY, Fri. June 26, 2009: `Going by some of the most influential texts on American immigration, one could easily come away with the notion that the Caribbean presence in the United States is a recent, at most a postwar, phenomenon,` states Winston James in `The History of Afro-Caribbean Migration to the United States.`

But as James points out, that could not be further from the truth as the history of Afro-Caribbeans and Afro-Americans is revealed most clearly during colonial period to the 1900.

As James posits, slaves in South Carolina came from the Caribbean, and Barbados in particular when the first known African slaver arrived in South Carolina in 1696.

The traffic from the Caribbean continued during the eighteenth century, despite the growing importance of direct trading with Africa. Thus, during the course of the eighteenth century, a conservative estimate suggests that between 15 and 20 percent of slaves to South Carolina came from the Caribbean, states James.

`One estimate put the ratio of Caribbean to African slaves at three to one between 1715 and 1730; and fully 70 percent of slaves arriving in New York between 1700 and 1730 came from elsewhere in the Americas,` write James. `Of the estimated 3,411 slaves imported by New Yorkers between 1715 and 1741, the largest number came from Jamaica, followed by Africa, Barbados, and Antigua.`

THIS CAHM FEATURE HAS BEEN BROUGHT TO YOU BY CARIBID, THE MOVEMENT TO GET CARIBBEAN NATIONAL ACCURATELY COUNTED AND THEIR OWN CATEGORY ON THE U.S. CENSUS FORM.